Jeep ¼ ton from Argentina

Other MV's, Non U.S. Manufacture
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charly
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Jeep ¼ ton from Argentina

Post by charly » Mon Apr 11, 2016 10:32 am

Good morning!! :D
I am Carlos Bouza and thank you for accepting me in the Forum.
Sorry for my English, I'm from the city of Buenos Aires in Argentina and I have a jeep brand IKA (Industrias Kaiser Argentina) M101 model manufactured under license Kaiser (cj-5) in 1974.
This model is made on the basis of the civilian jeep for the Argentine army and be used in communications (similar to what happened to the Cj-5 transformed into M606-A1 /A2)

Kaiser Industries is an Argentinean based company organized with American capitals and head managers, developed by local working force. On Jan 19th 1955, Kaiser would become the first capital American automobile company, production based in Argentina. IKA was born. They now needed to location, and this problem was solved as soon as the Nores Martinez family donated some 30 hectares for the plant to be constructed at. The key to understanding this is that this wealthy family still owned all the area's land, so its property's value would rise immediately due to the strategic location. IKA Soon would develop at a fantastic rate coming to use over 225 hectares. IKA was the monument to modernity within the auto industry in Argentina. A battalion of engineers from cities all over the world came to Argentina expertise to work on the development of IKA, featuring Latin America's finest top technology applied into industries. Tide bonds with the US assured IKA to constant flow of technology and machinery of great quality. In just a matter of 13 months an empire of car production was built, and it didn't just impacted as competition, but it also reflected its energetic production into related industries. Jeep was it's first and foremost important asset, allowing IKA that first and necessary jump to success. On April 27th, 1956, the first fully Argentinean made Jeep was roaming and rolling. Such was the success that only 145 days after the first IKA Jeep entered the market, they had produced over 1,000 Jeeps! It's important to point out that throughout these first years, it's wasn't just a matter of production, but also IKA aimed to produced as much as they could in a local basis, unlike other competitors who imported almost everything and then unassembled it in Argentina. IKA was the mouthful of fresh air the Argentinian industry needed to take off. Just to picture out IKA's relevance within the local market, in throughout it's 12 years of production over 20,000 workers depended on IKA for their work. But it wasn't just about job. That was - and still is-to all those who lived back then – not the only input from IKA to the Cordoba community, for the American-Argentinean company focused also on specialized education: Academy Arguello, Anglo Argentine School of Alta Gracia, IKA Technical Institute. IKA played a central role also in broader cultural aspects, such as holding Art biennials; sports through means of the Championships and Industrial Inter group-home Don Orione. All these broad cultural and social activities were specially designed and carried on throughout the times were James McCloud was chairman. It was a two way street for IKA and the Argentineans and it proved to work perfectly.
In 1959 IKA becomes IKA Renault, as a result of a joint venture between the American-Argentine company and the French one to produce the French model cars. Soon in 1962, another joint model venture would take place between IKA and American MotorsCorporation from Detroit; the first Ramblers were produced in Argentina back then.
Among the models produced by IKA throughout it's history are these: In 1956 2,400 Jeep pickup and Jeep were produced. By 1957 the Estanciera and in 1958 Kaiser Carabela, the first grand tourism car fully made in Argentina. For it's 10 year anniversary the Santa Isabel plant was producing IKA completo finest line of broad models: four Renault: Dauphine, Gordini, R4L and R4F; six utility models: Jeep pickup, Jeep Estanciera (also taxi version), Jeep truck, Jeep Gladiator (500, 1000 kilos) - simple and double traction - and Charge. Plus four Rambler models: Classic Custom, Classic de Luxe, Classic and Ambassador 990 cross country. By 1966 they were producing the outstanding Torino model (coupe and sedan). This was an integral IKA designed and developed model.
One of IKA's keys to success was what they called combined escalating steps, meaning that each task needed to improve production locally was linked to other minor industries and companies working together but separately in order to combine efforts and perspectives for a broader and bigger production goal.
In short, IKA Argentina was one of the many international Kaiser companies who worked by the theme "together we build", being active community members as well as cultural guides and focal points.
Send some picture.

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Regards

Carlos

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gerrykan
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Re: Jeep ¼ ton from Argentina

Post by gerrykan » Tue Apr 12, 2016 4:36 am

Carlos,
Thank you for posting IKA's history.

Your Jeep looks very good.
Roy

charly
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Re: Jeep ¼ ton from Argentina

Post by charly » Sat Apr 30, 2016 4:59 am

Good morning!

Thank you Roy :D

My jeep has a 4 cylinder engine Continental 4 L 151 derived 6 cylinder 6 L 226 of the Willys truck engine ( Super Hurricane ). (maybe I think the engine Continental 4Y 112 furnishing to the Bantam jeep)
Not used the Cj5 original engine (Hurricane 4 cil.) because with these machines is could manufacture in Argentina two types of motors with lower cost.

6L-226 motor

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4L-151 motor

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Hurricane 4cil.

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A bit of history…..

Continental Motors
The early years of the auto industry were extremely competitive, as hundreds of carmakers entered the market, all looking to carve out a niche. Marquee names like Peerless and Stutz fought for a share of the luxury car business, while Dodge, Studebaker, Hudson, Graham, and dozens of others jostled for space in the mid and low-price market. But for all of their differences in styles, amenities, and prices, all of these companies and more had one thing in common: An engine made by Continental Motors under the hood.
Continental Motors can trace its roots back to 1903, when engineer Ross Judson presented a 2-cylinder engine at the Chicago Auto Show. As orders for the engine came in, the company incorporated as Continental Motors, and built a plant in Muskegon, MI in 1905. Continental's first major order for 100 engines came from Studebaker in 1906. A year later Studebaker needed 1,000 engines, and by 1911, Hudson was asking for 10,000 engines.
In order to be closer to the plants of their customers, Continental began construction on a large plant along Jefferson Avenue on the east side of Detroit in 1911. The two-story factory designed by Albert Khan was finished in 1912, with a capacity of 18,000 to 22,000 engines per year. Overlooking the plant and its separate two-story office building was the iconic smokestack with CONTINENTAL written down its side, with a 1,000 horsepower plant underneath.
Continental Motors dominated the automobile engine market through the 1910's and 20's, supplying motors to over 120 manufacturers in Detroit and around the country. In 1929, the company began building aircraft engines, and became a major supplier for small aircraft. Despite its use in so many brands, Continental remained a relatively unknown name to the consumer. When the company started building cars under the Continental name in the early 1930's they were poorly received by the public, and production ended after just a few years.
The Great Depression wiped out many of the smaller automakers, nearly taking Continental with it. The aircraft engine part of the business kept the company afloat until the onset of the Second World War.
In 1939 the plant was converted over to build tank engines and engine parts. To test the engines before they were put into use, concrete testing cells were added onto the north side of the plant in 1942. Control rooms with blast-proof glass and thick concrete chambers allowed engineers to mount the engines and run them up to full power.
In the post-war years, the independent auto market shrank, decreasing demand for Continental engines. Anticipating reduced output, Continental mothballed part of the plant, and used the rest as a warehouse.
However, in 1945 a new automaker appeared on the scene, ready to take advantage of the pent-up demand for cars. Kaiser-Frazer was a joint venture between Henry J. Kaiser, a ship builder, and Joseph W. Frazer, who had been an executive at Chrysler. While other automakers struggled to convert back to civilian production, Kaiser-Frazer quickly rolled out a new design, and contracted with Continental to make the engines. Kaiser-Frazer engines began rolling off the Continental Motors-Detroit assembly line in November of 1946, and in early 1947, K-F leased the Jefferson Avenue plant from Continental. The Detroit Engine Division of Kaiser-Frazer Corporation employed 1,200 workers, and by August of 1947 was producing over 12,000 engines a month.
Though initially successful, Kaiser-Frazer foundered as the major automakers brought new products to market, and auto engine production was moved to other facilities in 1949. Part of the Detroit Engine Division plant was cleared out in 1951 and retooled for defense work, including motors for training planes and helicopters. Kaiser-Frazer bought the plant outright from Continental in late 1951, but the Korean War ended in 1953 just as military production was ramping up. When Kaiser-Frazer merged with Willys-Overland in 1953, most engine production was moved down to the Jeep factory in Toledo, OH. The Jefferson plant closed in 1955, and most of the tooling was sent to Argentina, where Kaiser was involved in a joint venture to produce cars.
Most of the plant had been demolished by 1961, aside from the power plant, a foundry building, and the test cells. Most of the land close to Jefferson was cleared, and in 1976 a new postal facility and an office for the Michigan Department of Social Services were built.
The plant’s last occupant was a metal smelting and recycling company called Continental Aluminum, which was formed in 1979. There was no relationship between this new company and Continental Motors, which had been acquired by Teledyne Incorporated in 1969. Continental Aluminum used only the foundry part of the plant to recycle aluminum, a process that is highly toxic. After numerous environmental complaints and fines, the company moved to a new factory out in the suburbs in 1998, abandoning the Jefferson Avenue plant.
Scrappers began eating away at the warehouse in 2006. The foundry was demolished in 2008, leaving only the test cells and the what’s left of the power plant. The water tower disappeared in 2011, taken down by scrappers
The first jeep IKA fulfilled 60 years.
Some photos

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Regards

Carlos

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